Recorded Devotional for Seminary Seniors who Didn’t Get the Old Testament

UPDATE: Had technical problems with the recording; no audio got recorded at all. So, announcement coming in the next few days about a repeat of sorts. 

 

With the alignment of Seminary to the Come Follow Me schedule, this year’s high school seniors will graduate with D&C twice, but no Old Testament.
Continue reading “Recorded Devotional for Seminary Seniors who Didn’t Get the Old Testament”

Science as a Legitimate Contributor to our Knowledge of Creation and Earth History

As noted in a prior post, Orson F. Whitney authored the 1909 First Presidency statement on “The Origin of Man.” He sent a letter to John Widtsoe with that draft, along with some notes. Although Whitney was strongly opposed to evolution, he acknowledge that science could play a role in clarifying earth history.   Continue reading “Science as a Legitimate Contributor to our Knowledge of Creation and Earth History”

D&C 20:1, Plain Reading, and Literal Reading; or, Chexegesis Before You Wrexegesis

The line “check yourself before you wreck yourself” is from a rap song and also happens to be good advice. “Chexegesis before you wrexegesis” adapts that wisdom to the realm of scripture, that you shouldn’t make strong declarations about scripture’s meaning without checking up on what it actually says and means. Continue reading “D&C 20:1, Plain Reading, and Literal Reading; or, Chexegesis Before You Wrexegesis”

What I’m Doing Here, and What I Hope Others Will Do

I am not an “evolution apologist.” Although I suspect I have more scientific training than your average historian, I’m not a scientist. And more likely than not, neither is my average reader. For that reason, and because I don’t follow the specialized and technical literature, I don’t engage in scientific debate about evolution. Rather, in keeping with my own training and expertise, my approach is historical, scriptural, and theological.  And historically, I understand how and why evolution has come to be the dominant way to make sense of mountains of data across multiple fields, and why 98% of scientists accept evolution as the best explanation of all that data. Continue reading “What I’m Doing Here, and What I Hope Others Will Do”